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Cervical Cancer

ABOUT CERVICAL CANCER

According to the American Cancer Society, cervical cancer was one of the most common causes of cancer death for women in America. But over the last 30 years, the cervical cancer death rate has decreased by more than 50 percent due to the increased use of the Pap test. If cervical cancer is detected early, it is one of the most successfully treated cancers. Women, take charge of your health, and talk to your doctor about screening recommendations. Early detection saves lives!

January is cervical cancer awareness month
RISK FACTORS

Risk factors for cervical cancer include infection by the human papilloma virus (HPV), smoking and family history. Women at high risk might include those with HIV infection, organ transplant or exposure to the drug DES. For questions about risk factors, talk with your doctor.

SYMPTOMS

Symptoms of cervical cancer may include abnormal vaginal bleeding, such as bleeding after vaginal sex, bleeding after menopause, bleeding and spotting between periods, and having (menstrual) periods that are longer or heavier than usual. Bleeding after douching or after a pelvic exam may also occur. Other symptoms may include pain during sex or an unusual discharge from the vagina. The discharge may contain some blood and may occur between your periods or after menopause.

Source: cancer.org

SCREENINGS

WHEN TO GET SCREENED FOR CERVICAL CANCER

All women should begin cervical cancer screening at age 21. Women between the ages of 21 and 29 should have a Pap test every 3 years. Usually, they do not be tested for HPV unless it is needed after an abnormal Pap test result. Women between the ages of 30 and 65 should have both a Pap test and an HPV test every 5 years. This is the preferred approach, but it is also OK to have a Pap test alone every 3 years.

Women who are at high risk for cervical cancer may need to be screened more often. They should talk with their doctor or nurse.

Source: cancer.org

CLINICAL TRIALS

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human beings in order to test new ways to prevent, detect, diagnose or treat diseases. A drug must be part of a clinical trial before the FDA will approve it to be put on the market. Oncology clinical trials are conducted in order to test new drugs or a new combination of drug treatments, new surgery and radiation therapies and new medical devices.

Every cancer center patient is evaluated for participation in a clinical trial. Those who meet the criteria to participate in clinical research receive a standard of care treatment, but with the added benefit of a trial that may enhance their outcomes.

If interested in volunteering to participate in a clinical research trial, or if you have concerns about the conduct of clinical research, please contact the Clinical Research office at (225) 215-1353, or by email at clinicalresearch@marybird.com.

Trial Number: GOG 0263

Title: Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial of Adjuvant Radiation versus Chemo radiation in Intermediate Risk Stage I/IIA Cervical Cancer Treated with Initial Radical Hysterectomy and Pelvic Lymphadenectomy

Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy with chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with stage I or stage II cervical cancer who previously underwent surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with cervical cancer.

Physicians: Dr. Patricia Braly

Offered in: Baton Rouge (Breast & GYN Cancer Pavilion), Covington

Trial Number: Genentech-GOG-3015/Y039523

Title: Phase III, Multicenter, Randomized, Study of Atezolizumab Versus Placebo Administered in Combination with Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab to Patients with Newly-Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

Purpose: This study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of Atezolizumab administered with Paclitaxel + Carboplatin + Bevacizumab compared with Placebo + Paclitaxel + Carboplatin + Bevacizumab in patients with newly diagnosed, untreated ovarian, fallopian tube, and/or primary peritoneal cancer.

Physician: Dr. Giles Fort

Offered in: Baton Rouge (Breast & GYN Cancer Pavilion)