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Healing Arts

HEALING ARTS

The therapeutic potential of visual art to stimulate healing is well documented in research, and the elements of the Healing Arts program provide relief from the anxiety and pain of illness, offering inspiration to courageous patients and their loved ones. The artwork displayed throughout the Cancer Center was created by regional artists and is designed to present beauty for patients and other guests. Healing Arts also complements our comprehensive treatment programs and includes a patient component where survivors participate in art projects to promote healing and well-being.

MARY BIRD PERKINS – OUR LADY OF THE LAKE HEALING ARTS PROGRAM
CURATING THE CANCER CENTER
EMOTIONS IN ART
MIND BODY MEDICINE
STEPHEN WILSON: MEDITATION ART WALL (LORD, HEAR OUR PRAYERS)

179_mary_150701A beautiful intertwining of color, the Meditation Art Wall was created as an aesthetic bridge between the Center’s legacy of stained glass and Wilson’s inventive vision realized through the process of Gemeaux. Designed to reflect tranquility, kindness, warmth and imagination, the balance of architecture and artwork is eloquently illustrated through modern and traditional views of our natural landscape blended with references to light and earth. Wilson’s art conveys a meaningful connection between the physical and emotional journey of the healing process – a journey that resonates with all that enter the Center.

MAKING OF THE MEDITATION ART WALL
MEDITATION ART WALL
KATE TREPAGNIER: EARLY MORNING LIGHT

003_mary_150701Trepagnier’s pastel drawings and oil paintings offer a visual trace of creativity’s inherent energy as she develops a tension between small recognizable landscape elements contrasted with larger abstracted exaggerations. Rooted in intuitive vision and connected to her environment, Trepagnier’s artwork embodies nature’s essence, imparting a life-affirming sense of growth and optimism and bringing strength and encouragement to patients.

MIA KAPLAN: WHAT THE SWAMP MEANS TO ME

050_mary_150701Kaplan’s work explores different avenues including plein-air paintings of Big Branch Marsh, botanical illustrations of native plants and large scale sculptures. What ties her work together is her sensitivity to movement and color, which she uses to reflect her natural surroundings. These impressive representations of local landscapes serve to lift patient spirits through inspiring reflection on the botanical beauty found throughout our state.

KATE TREPAGNIER: THE OAKS

the-oaks3These vast trees emanate breadth of experience, completeness and survival. They are shaped by humankind, wind, water and soil. They began as an acorn.

DOUG DETIVEAUX: MARSH CANOPY

marsh-canopyThe imagery has a tie to the local landscape of the South, with low hanging canopies, historic foliage and the cool colors that reference the river and our marsh landscape.

PAUL YANKO: PROP FOLD FRISSURE, BAND RAY WING

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Yanko’s panels are a reference to sun and nature, typically taking on a kaleidoscope formation. His color choices promote a lightness and sense of joy found throughout his work. This piece was chosen not only on its artistic merit, but also because of the recognizable relationship to the Meditation Art Wall glass.

ROBERT RECTOR: WATERS OF THE WORLD

015_mary_150701Utilizing the varied seas and oceans of the globe as an example for the congregation of diversity, Rector’s special commission reflects the waters of the world. “This painting is about letting natural impulses and instincts become the guiding force in life, healing and meditation,” says Rector. Rector’s work presents the viewer with a comforting sense of calm and serenity through its unique, multi-dimensional representation of our world’s waters.

ELISE MORRIS: REFLECTING ABOVE

021_mary_150701Morris’ painting represents the process of being present to what comes. “It is the light that makes the shadows that I so love to draw,” says Morris. “Where there is light, there is clarity and warmth there, it’s a basic element in our daily experience, and the hope of what is ahead.” The light that Morris elegantly captures through her paintings brings a sense of warmth to her work and hopefulness to its viewers.

KATE BLACKLOCK: ILLUMINATED FROM WITHIN: X-RAY FLORA

039_mary_150701Art has the ability to take the viewer to another place. To pull the viewers out of themselves and to transport them on an adventure. When an artwork is successful, the viewer gets lost in this experience. Time is suspended. The weight of the body lifts and our senses are heightened. Blacklock uses the color and the tranquility of flowers floating in white spaces as the vehicles. The scale of the pieces and compositions between the flowers are meant to suggest human relationships – soft touch, cradle or comfort.

KATE TREPAGNIER: ABBEY TREE – SUNRISE

059_mary_150701Trepagnier’s pastel drawings and oil paintings offer a visual trace of creativity’s inherent energy as she develops a tension between small recognizable landscape elements contrasted with larger abstracted exaggerations. Rooted in intuitive vision and connected to her environment, Trepagnier’s artwork embodies nature’s essence, imparting a life-affirming sense of growth and optimism and bringing strength and encouragement to patients.

C.C. LOCKWOOD: CYPRESS ALLEY

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C.C. LOCKWOOD: WETLAND SUNSET

fifth-floor

KRISTA ROCHE: SPARKLIES

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Roche’s most recent works are color compositions in acrylic and collage. In these small gem-like works, she makes use of her collection of fine Japanese papers to add color, complexity and pattern to her avian-themed paintings. The composed, tranquil nature of Roche’s work exudes an aura of warmth and orderly calm, a welcome expression for patients bravely coping with cancer’s many challenges.

DOUG KENNEDY: MAGNOLIA I, MAGNOLIA II

106_mary_150701Using traditional methods of oil and acrylic painting, pencils and occasionally collage, Kennedy captures moments of action within the natural rivers and flora of Louisiana, leading him to a place of visual harmony. Evoking nature’s underlying energy, Kennedy’s art conveys a calm vitality and dynamism that speaks to the quiet strength, fortitude and perseverance displayed by those bravely fighting cancer.

SHERYL SOUTHWICK: MOSAIC RAIN

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Southwick’s Mosaic Series represents the natural landscape of water, land and horizon through the use of collage. “My paintings have always had sort of broken up surfaces,” says Southwick. “I was influenced by the post-impressionist painters a lot. I like surface break up because I think it makes one’s eyes dance over the landscape. It’s not static at all.” Southwick’s expression of natural landscapes provide a vibrant vista of positive energy for patients, their families and Cancer Center team members to draw strength from.

MICHAEL CUTLIP: SPRINGTIME

137_mary_150701“I draw inspiration from most that is naive,” says Cutlip. “Children are, hands down, the best artists. Their freedom and uninhibited nature taps into that certain energy which all mature artists seek their entire lives.”

“Urban nature, street art, things old, vintage, worn-out, discarded, natural beauty in its abstract form and simply the moment, the moment of creation – where one move inspires the next. One has to only open his eyes… beauty is everywhere.”

BILLY BOURGEOIS: ROSE THICKET

131_mary_150701Bourgeois’ work ethereally hovers between realism and abstraction in an effort to capture the essence of life in every image. “My goal as an artist is response, not representation,” says Bourgeois. “I want my mark-making to reveal my inner impulse, my excitement and gratitude about life,” – a sentiment that reflects a positive attitude so important to patients courageously dealing with cancer.

© Copyright 2017 Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. All rights reserved.