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Lung Cancer

ABOUT LUNG CANCER

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths in Louisiana. Detecting lung cancer in its earliest stages can mean more tomorrows. Take charge of your health, and learn the facts. Be aware of lung cancer symptoms, risk factors, prevention and early detection.

SCREENINGS

Risk Factors:
Risk factors for lung cancer include smoking and secondhand smoke, radon and asbestos exposure and pollution. In addition, family history, cancer history and history of COPD or Pulmonary Fibrosis could put you at greater risk. High Risk Status Screenings are recommended for ages 55-74 with a smoking history of 30 pack years or more and less than 15 years of smoking cessation; and ages 50 or older with a smoking history of minimum 20 pack years with at least one additional risk factor other than secondhand smoke.

Symptoms:
Some signs of lung cancer may include a cough that does not go away or gets worse, coughing up blood or rust-colored sputum (spit or phlegm), new onset of wheezing or chest pain that is often worse with deep breathing, coughing, or laughing. Other symptoms could be hoarseness, weight loss and loss of appetite, shortness of breath or feeling tired or weak, or infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia that don’t go away or keep coming back.

Source: cancer.org

When to Get Screened:

  • Age 55 – 77 years
  • Asymptomatic (no signs or symptoms of lung cancer)
  • Tobacco smoking history of at least 30 pack-years (one pack-year = smoking one pack per day for one year; 1 pack = 20 cigarettes)
  • Current smoker or one who has quit smoking within the last 15 years
  • Receives a written order for LDCT lung cancer screening

For eligibility and more information, please call to schedule a lung cancer screening.

  • Baton Rouge and Gonzales: (225) 230-2525
  • Covington: (985) 898-4581
  • Houma: (985) 850-6052

MESOTHELIOMA

Mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer, often caused by exposure to asbestos and other hazardous toxins. It can take 40-50 years to develop. The majority of mesothelioma patients begin to exhibit symptoms of this disease with shortness of breath and chest pain.

In diagnosing the disease, patients are x-rayed to detect fluid in the chest. Fluid that accumulates as a result of mesothelioma will usually come back rapidly after being drained. If fluid is detected, biopsies from tissue around the lung will be obtained. Brain MRIs and PET scans can also be a part of the diagnosis process.

Treatment options for mesothelioma include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation (or a combination of the three). Other key aspects of treatment include nutrition, pain management, and psychosocial issues.

In affiliation with CVT Surgical Center, Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center’s Mesothelioma Program offers a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach for the development of an optimal care plan for patients. The Cancer Center’s Mesothelioma Specialty Treatment Team, a subsection of the Lung Cancer Multidisciplinary Care Team, includes pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists and interventional radiologists, and it is supported by a patient navigator who ensures personalized continuity of care at every stage.

GEAUX FREE

geaux_free_logo_2013_stacked_color_tag-01Quitting can be a challenge, but you don’t have to do it alone.

The Cancer Center offers our Geaux Free tobacco treatment program at no cost for people who want to kick the habit. Geaux Free helps individuals prepare for quitting, managing withdrawal symptoms, identifying triggers that create urges, learning new behavior and skills to remain tobacco-free, and developing a support network. Learn more.

For more information or to schedule an appointment with our certified tobacco treatment specialist, please call (225) 215-1274.

PATIENT STORIES

WANDA POCHE, LUNG CANCER SURVIVOR

“This holiday season will be the best ever because I have so very much to be grateful for,” said Wanda. “In the new year, I want to continue doing what I do best: make people laugh. I also want to travel, dance and fish. I’ve got so much life left to live and with the help of God, Dr. Cataldo and immunotherapy, I’m going to do just that.”

Wanda blog header

DISEASE SITE TEAM

Disease site teams, or multidisciplinary care teams, are specialists from each diagnostic, treatment and supportive care discipline working together in the same facility where state-of-the-art cancer treatment is given, and relevant research is conducted.

CLINICAL TRIALS

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human beings in order to test new ways to prevent, detect, diagnose or treat diseases. A drug must be part of a clinical trial before the FDA will approve it to be put on the market. Oncology clinical trials are conducted in order to test new drugs or a new combination of drug treatments, new surgery and radiation therapies and new medical devices.

Every cancer center patient is evaluated for participation in a clinical trial. Those who meet the criteria to participate in clinical research receive a standard of care treatment, but with the added benefit of a trial that may enhance their outcomes.

If interested in volunteering to participate in a clinical research trial, or if you have concerns about the conduct of clinical research, please contact the Clinical Research office at (225) 215-1353, or by email at clinicalresearch@marybird.com.

Trial Number: EA5161

Title: Randomized Phase II Clinical Trial of Cisplatin/Carboplatin and Etoposide (CE) Alone or in Combination with Nivolumab as Frontline Therapy for Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (ED-SCLC)

Purpose: This randomized phase II clinical trial studies whether the addition of Nivolumab to Cisplatin (or Carboplatin) and Etoposide work will improve outcomes when treating patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer.

Physicians: Drs. Bryan Bienvenu, Vince Cataldo, Robert Fields, David Hanson, Kellie Schmeeckle, Joseph Shows, Derrick Spell, Siva Yadlapati and Lauren ZatarainJames Carinder and Jack Saux; Robert Gamble, Naveed Khan, and Genevieve Maronage.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, Houma

Trial Number: Alliance A151216

Title: Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trial (ALCHEMIST)

Purpose: This research trial studies genetic testing in screening patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been or will be removed by surgery. Studying the genes in a patient’s tumor cells may help doctors select the best treatment for patients that have certain genetic changes.

Physicians: Drs. Bryan Bienvenu, Vince Cataldo, David Hanson, Kellie Schmeeckle, Joseph Shows, Derrick SpellSiva Yadlapati and Lauren Zatarain; James Carinder and Jack Saux; Robert Gamble and Naveed Khan.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, and Houma.

Trial Number: Alliance A081105

Title: Randomized Double Blind Placebo Controlled Study of Erlotinib or Placebo in Patients with Completely Resected Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies how well erlotinib hydrochloride compared to placebo works in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been completely removed by surgery. Erlotinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

Physicians: Drs. Bryan BienvenuVince CataldoDavid HansonKellie SchmeeckleJoseph ShowsDerrick SpellSiva Yadlapati and Lauren ZatarainJames Carinder and Jack SauxRobert Gamble and Naveed Khan.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, and Houma.

Trial Number:  E4512

Title: A Phase III Double-Blind Trial for Surgically Resected Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Crizotinib Versus Placebo for Patients with Tumors Harboring the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Fusion Protein

Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies how well crizotinib works and compares it to placebo in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been removed by surgery and has a mutation in a protein called anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Mutations, or changes, in ALK can make it very active and important for tumor cell growth and progression. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the ALK protein from working. Crizotinib may be an effective treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer and an ALK fusion mutation.

Physicians: Drs. Bryan BienvenuVince CataldoDavid HansonKellie SchmeeckleJoseph Shows, Derrick SpellSiva Yadlapati and Lauren ZatarainJames Carinder and Jack SauxRobert Gamble and Naveed Khan.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, and Houma.

Trial Number: S1400

Title: A Biomarker-Driven Master Protocol for Previously Treated Squamous Cell Lung Cancer (Lung-Map)

Purpose: This screening and multi-sub-study randomized phase II/III trial will establish a method for genomic screening of similar large cancer populations followed by assigning and accruing simultaneously to a multi-sub-study hybrid “Master Protocol” (S1400). The type of cancer trait (biomarker) will determine to which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned to compare new targeted cancer therapy, designed to block the growth and spread of cancer, or combinations to standard of care therapy with the ultimate goal of being able to approve new targeted therapies in this setting. In addition, the protocol includes a “non-match” sub-study which will include all screened patients not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies. This sub-study will compare a non-match therapy to standard of care also with the goal of approval.

Physicians: Drs. Bryan BienvenuVince CataldoDavid HansonKellie SchmeeckleJoseph ShowsDerrick SpellSiva Yadlapati and Lauren ZatarainJames Carinder and Jack SauxRobert Gamble and Naveed Khan.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, Houma

Trial Number: EA5142

Title: Adjuvant Nivolumab in Resected Lung Cancers (ANVIL)-A Randomized Phase III Study of Nivolumab After Surgical Resection and Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies how well nivolumab after surgery and chemotherapy work in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and kill tumor cells remaining after surgery and standard of care chemotherapy.

Physicians: Drs. Bryan BienvenuVince CataldoDavid HansonKellie SchmeeckleJoseph Shows, Derrick SpellSiva Yadlapati and Lauren Zatarain James Carinder and Jack SauxRobert Gamble and Naveed Khan.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, and Houma.

Trial Number: Alliance A211401

Title: Reducing Surgical Complications in Newly Diagnosed Lung Cancer Patients who Smoke Cigarettes

Purpose: This randomized phase III trial studies how well management of a tobacco treatment intervention works in reducing surgical complications in patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer who smoke cigarettes. Management of a tobacco treatment intervention compares Varenicline (a drug that reduces the craving and withdrawal symptoms that occur with abstinence from nicotine) and behavioral interventions (consisting of a brief clinician-delivered intervention and tobacco quitline [tobacco cessation service available through a toll-free telephone number] follow-up) with placebo (a pill with no active medication) along with similar behavioral interventions. It is not yet known whether management of a tobacco treatment intervention is more effective in reducing surgical complications than placebo.

Physicians: Drs. Jingya Wang, Charles Wood, Siva Yadlapati and Lauren Zatarain; James Carinder, Andrew Elson and Jack Saux; Robert Gamble, Naveed Khan and Jeffrey Long.

Offered in: Baton Rouge, Covington, and Houma.