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Tags Archives: Early Detection

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2 years ago Houma

Probability and Prostate Cancer

One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Mr. Eldon Bourg never thought he’d be the one.

One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Mr. Eldon Bourg never thought he’d be the one.

Born and raised in Grand Caillou and deeply rooted in his community, Bourg has never lived life by the numbers. He has spent his life working and growing his family in the Houma area. He married, had three children and nine grandchildren. But, he was also diagnosed with stage four prostate cancer at the age of 63.

During a routine checkup, Bourg told his doctor that he had been experiencing some pain in his lower abdomen. His doctor referred him to urologist, who recognized the symptoms of prostate cancer and had Bourg tested. He had never been screened before, but the results were positive, and in 2012 he was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer.

Bourg was treated at Mary Bird Perkins TGMC Cancer Center and now, five years later, counts himself a survivor. Bourg doesn’t allow his diagnosis to define him and still lives his life outside of the statistics, but now he advocates for others to get screened for prostate cancer.  “Right now, I’m talking to my sons about getting screened. It’s important,” says Bourg.

Mr. Eldon

“I would tell any man thinking about getting screened to start the conversation with their doctors. You need to be proactive about your health.”

The American Cancer Society recommends men be aware of the risk factors associated with prostate cancer and discuss screening options with their doctors. Men with average risk should asses their needs for screenings at age 50. Those with higher risk, including those with a family history should start at age 40 or 45.

Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center offers free prostate cancer screenings to men 45 and older who have not been screened for prostate cancer in the past 12 months. For a complete calendar of available screenings, click here.

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2 years ago Baton Rouge

Cancer Center’s 10th Annual Fest For Life Achieves Milestones

Ten years and more than 5,000 screened

 

(Baton Rouge, La.) Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center’s Fest for Life event recently reached two major milestones: 10 years of providing prevention and early detection services and more than 5,000 people screened in the history of the event. The Cancer Center reports that hundreds were tested for cancer and other health conditions at Fest for Life, April 22 at Bon Carre’ Business Center.

“Fest for Life’s longevity and continued growth speaks to the increasing need for these services in the community,” said Johnnay Benjamin, the Cancer Center’s early detection and education director. “Whether people are insured or uninsured, research shows many individuals aren’t accessing early detection services, causing more late stage diagnoses. And finding cancer early is the best offense when it comes to fighting the disease. Fest for Life continues to fulfill this important community need, and the support and participation we receive underscores its significance to so many people.”

Following is an overview of screening statistics for Fest for Life 2017:

  • 569 cancer screenings
  • 256 people participated in other health screenings such as blood pressure, glucose and heart rhythm tests
  • 26 participants had abnormal findings detected from screenings; they are currently being supported by a patient navigator for additional testing and follow-up care

Special thanks to Fest for Life’s presenting sponsor, Karnival Krewe de Louisiane, and the other generous supporters: Allied Waste Services, Amerigroup, Associated Grocers, Avita Pharmacy, Capitol City Produce, Greater Baton Rouge State Fair, Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Cupcake Junkie, CVS, Entergy, Fit Body Bootcamp, Flowers Baking Company, Hi Nabor, Humana, Leroy’s Lipsmack’n Lemonade, 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge, Roy’s Ice and Screen Printed Images.

The Cancer Center offers prevention and early detection services year round. For information on upcoming screenings, call (225) 215-1234 or visit marybirdlake.org.

 

 

 

About Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center
As a regional destination for cancer care, Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center offers the most advance technology and services provided by a dedicated team of nationally-recognized oncology experts. The Cancer Center provides best-practice, comprehensive care at every stage of the cancer journey, including disease site-specific multidisciplinary care teams, a robust clinical research program, extensive supportive care services and is the only facility in the Gulf South with the revolutionary Leksell Gamma Knife®Icon™. As a nonprofit organization, donor generosity is essential to sustaining the mission of improving survivorship and lessening the burden of cancer for so many throughout Southeast Louisiana and beyond. For more information on the Cancer Center, and how you can become involved, please visit marybirdlake.org.

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2 years ago Baton Rouge

Fest for Life offers Lots of Louisiana-style Lagniappe

Louisiana is known for its fun, legendary festivals and events with unique spins on food, music and culture. However, ten years ago, something different premiered in Baton Rouge, offering an innovative approach to presenting cancer and other health topics with the same kind of flair. The annual event, Fest for Life, commenced in 2008, setting a new tone for delivering free cancer screenings, changing the way many people view these tests.

Hundreds are expected for this year’s tenth anniversary of Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center’s Fest for Life, Saturday, April 22 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Bon Carre’ Business Center, 7359 Florida Blvd. And living up to its reputation for a good time, East Baton Rouge Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome will kick off the event with a with a second line parade at 9:45 a.m. in honor of Fest for Life’s 10th anniversary.

Entertainment, food and games are all are a part of the scene and have become synonymous with the one-day health event, making potentially intimidating cancer screenings, fun.

Longtime Fest for Life participant Sharon Lindsey, a budding screenwriter, says that she began attending Fest for Life in 2013 to help ensure a healthier future. After losing her father to prostate cancer and having had numerous other relatives fight the disease, she takes no chances when it comes to her health.

“Over the years, I’ve brought my sister and nephews with me to Fest for Life because there’s something for everyone,” said Lindsey. “We’ve danced and enjoyed the food, but most of all we attended because of the screenings. It was a relief to know that we are in the clear, and now we are more educated on what we can do to help prevent cancer.”

Each year, Fest for Life offers five types of cancer and other life-saving health screenings and education, along musical entertainment, food, games for the kids and much more—all for free. Since Fest for Life began, more than 4,800 cancer screenings have been performed and 15 cancers have been detected. The event is part of the Cancer Center’s Prevention on the Go program.

Click here for more information on Fest for Life, or call (225) 215-1234.

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2 years ago Baton Rouge , Covington , Gonzales , Hammond , Houma

“Prevention on the Go” Gets Going

On the go…It’s an accurate phrase to describe today’s high-speed world, and how we literally bring screenings to the public. At the Cancer Center, we’re constantly transforming to keep pace with changing times to reach more people and save more lives. And we won’t stop until cancer is no more.

In this spirit, our early detection and outreach program is evolving and being renamed Prevention on the Go, reflecting an innovative and mobile-approach to bringing cancer education and screenings to people wherever they are.

There are two primary settings for Prevention on the Go, the community and the workplace.

Community:

For more than 15 years, the Cancer Center’s early detection and outreach team, recently nationally-recognized for its innovative practices, has traveled in its Early Bird mobile clinics to reach uninsured individuals and others disproportionately impacted by cancer in their own communities. However, many people are now accessing our services and demand continues to rise. Through Prevention on the Go, we are more broadly targeting the communities we serve in an effort to impact the highest number of people possible. For example, one of the programs we’ll soon launch is the “pop-up screening.” This is a new concept where the Cancer Center’s social media followers will be notified, and asked to share with their friends, that the Early Bird will be located and providing screening services at a specific place and time. These may happen near other events in a busy area or high traffic locations where participants can pop-in for a screening. For information on Prevention on the Go’s community program, contact Johnnay Benjamin at jbenjamin@marybird.com.

Workplace:

Last year, the Albemarle Foundation made a generous gift to Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center to launch an initiative, expanding its community outreach program to the corporate environment. Research shows that many insured people aren’t accessing cancer screenings because they don’t have the time, among other reasons. The Cancer Center’s workplace program eliminates many of these barriers, working with employers to bring education and screenings to their team members. After a successful pilot phase in 2016, the formal workplace program has launched and several companies are already signed-up. We see this as an opportunity to add a critical element to our outreach efforts and connect more people with lifesaving cancer screenings. For information on Prevention on the Go’s workplace program, contact Charity Gay at cgay@marybird.com.

Prevention on the Go will allow us to do more to prevent cancer and detect the disease earlier. Our commitment is that we’ll never stop working to improve survivorship and lessen the burden of cancer.

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2 years ago Baton Rouge , Covington , Gonzales , Hammond , Houma

Cancer: Nature Vs. Nurture

By Johnnay Benjamin, MPH, Director of Early Detection and Education

Did you know you have the power to help prevent cancer?

A recently-released study, receiving high profile media coverage, explores the age-old adage of nature versus nurture when it comes to cancer and cancer prevention. It reports that 66 percent of the genetic mutations that cause cancer are simple random errors in the way cells replace themselves in the body. While “random cancers” are a part of the picture, it’s important to remember that lifestyle and hereditary factors are still an important part of the equation; the American Cancer Society states that more than fifty percent of all cancer deaths can be prevented.

There are some things you can do to bridge the gap between nature and nurture. While it is known that some cancers cannot be prevented through lifestyle modifications alone, you can still reduce your risk of developing certain diseases by adopting some healthy practices:

Prevention Tips

For people who may develop cancer as a result of simple random errors in cell division, early detection is still the best way to beat cancer.  For breast, skin and colorectal cancers, regular screening tests can increase the chance of finding these diseases early when treatment options and opportunities for long term survival are greater.

While we can’t always control what nature will do, we all have the power to live a healthier life today.

Johnnay Benjamin, MPH, is the director of early detection and education at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. In this role, Benjamin and her team works to ensure that people throughout Southeast Louisiana have access to life-saving cancer screenings, as well as prevention and early detection education of the disease. The Cancer Center’s early detection program reaches 18 parishes through its Early Bird mobile medical clinics.

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2 years ago Baton Rouge , Covington , Gonzales , Hammond , Houma , Natchez

Prevention on the Go

On the go…It’s an accurate phrase to describe today’s high-speed world, and how we literally bring screenings to the public. At the Cancer Center, we’re constantly transforming to keep pace with changing times to reach more people and save more lives. And we won’t stop until cancer is no more.

In this spirit, our early detection and outreach program is evolving and being renamed Prevention on the Go, reflecting an innovative and mobile-approach to bringing cancer education and screenings to people wherever they are.

There are two primary settings for Prevention on the Go, the community and the workplace.

Community:

For more than 15 years, the Cancer Center’s early detection and outreach team, recently nationally-recognized for its innovative practices, has traveled in its Early Bird mobile clinics to reach uninsured individuals and others disproportionately impacted by cancer in their own communities. However, many people are now accessing our services and demand continues to rise. Through Prevention on the Go, we are more broadly targeting the communities we serve in an effort to impact the highest number of people possible. For example, one of the programs we’ll soon launch is the “pop-up screening.” This is a new concept where the Cancer Center’s social media followers will be notified, and asked to share with their friends, that the Early Bird will be located and providing screening services at a specific place and time. These may happen near other events in a busy area or high traffic locations where participants can pop-in for a screening. For information on Prevention on the Go’s community program, contact Johnnay Benjamin at jbenjamin@marybird.com.

Workplace:

Last year, the Albemarle Foundation made a generous gift to Mary Bird Perkins – Our Lady of the Lake Cancer Center to launch an initiative, expanding its community outreach program to the corporate environment. Research shows that many insured people aren’t accessing cancer screenings because they don’t have the time, among other reasons. The Cancer Center’s workplace program eliminates many of these barriers, working with employers to bring education and screenings to their team members. After a successful pilot phase in 2016, the formal workplace program has launched and several companies are already signed-up. We see this as an opportunity to add a critical element to our outreach efforts and connect more people with lifesaving cancer screenings. For information on Prevention on the Go’s workplace program, contact Charity Gay at cgay@marybird.com.

Prevention on the Go will allow us to do more to prevent cancer and detect the disease earlier. Our commitment is that we’ll never stop working to improve survivorship and lessen the burden of cancer.